Bananarama (Deep Sea Skiving)

Official Album Cover

The Album

Exploring “Deep Sea Skiving” by Bananarama: A Landmark in 80s Pop Music

“Deep Sea Skiving,” the debut album by the British girl group Bananarama, remains a defining moment in the landscape of 1980s pop music. Released on March 7, 1983, this album marked the arrival of a vibrant, new force in the music industry. Comprised of childhood friends Sara Dallin, Siobhan Fahey, and Keren Woodward, Bananarama brought a unique blend of infectious melodies, playful lyrics, and an unmistakable sense of fun that resonated with audiences worldwide.

The Birth of Bananarama

Before delving into the specifics of “Deep Sea Skiving,” it’s essential to understand the background of Bananarama. Formed in London in 1981, the trio quickly made a name for themselves with their distinctive style and sound. Their early work with the punk-influenced Fun Boy Three on the singles “It Ain’t What You Do (It’s the Way That You Do It)” and “Really Saying Something” set the stage for their future success. These collaborations showcased their knack for combining catchy hooks with a DIY ethos, an approach that would characterize their debut album.

Crafting “Deep Sea Skiving”

“Deep Sea Skiving” was produced by a team that included Steve Jolley and Tony Swain, who were instrumental in shaping the sound of British pop in the early 80s. The album features a mix of original songs and covers, all infused with Bananarama’s signature style. The production is polished yet retains a sense of spontaneity, reflecting the band’s energetic and carefree spirit.

Track Highlights

  1. “Shy Boy”: One of the standout tracks on the album, “Shy Boy,” exemplifies Bananarama’s ability to blend pop sensibilities with a touch of sass. The song’s infectious chorus and upbeat tempo made it a hit, reaching number 4 on the UK Singles Chart.
  2. “Really Saying Something”: This track, a collaboration with Fun Boy Three, is a cover of the Velvettes’ 1964 hit. Bananarama’s version adds a modern twist, with its catchy rhythms and harmonious vocals. It became a major hit, further establishing the group in the pop music scene.
  3. “Cheers Then”: A poignant departure from the album’s predominantly upbeat tone, “Cheers Then” is a bittersweet ballad that showcases the group’s versatility. The song’s melancholic lyrics and reflective melody highlight Bananarama’s ability to convey deeper emotions.
  4. “Aie a Mwana”: This track, a cover of a Swahili song by Black Blood, was Bananarama’s debut single. Its eclectic mix of African rhythms and new wave influences underscores the band’s adventurous approach to music.
  5. “Na Na Hey Hey Kiss Him Goodbye”: Another cover, this time of the 1969 hit by Steam, “Na Na Hey Hey Kiss Him Goodbye” became a signature song for Bananarama. Their version is spirited and fun, capturing the essence of their playful image.

Impact and Legacy

“Deep Sea Skiving” was a commercial success, reaching number 7 on the UK Albums Chart and earning Bananarama a gold certification. The album’s blend of catchy pop tunes and innovative covers resonated with a wide audience, paving the way for future successes. Bananarama’s image—unpretentious, fun-loving, and stylish—challenged the prevailing stereotypes of female pop stars, offering a fresh and relatable alternative.

The album’s influence extended beyond its immediate commercial success. Bananarama’s approach to pop music—combining strong melodies, a sense of fun, and an unpolished charm—inspired future generations of female artists. Their success demonstrated that a girl group could achieve critical and commercial acclaim while maintaining control over their image and sound.

Conclusion

“Deep Sea Skiving” remains a landmark album in the history of pop music. It introduced the world to Bananarama’s unique blend of infectious pop, playful lyrics, and distinctive style. The album’s success established Bananarama as one of the leading female groups of the 1980s and left a lasting impact on the music industry. With “Deep Sea Skiving,” Bananarama not only made a significant cultural impact but also laid the groundwork for their enduring legacy in pop music.

Track Listing

  1. Shy Boy
  2. Doctor Love
  3. What A Shambles
  4. Cheers Then
  5. Aie a Mwana
  6. Young At Heart
  7. Na Na Hey Hey (Kiss Him Goodbye)
  8. Hey Young London
  9. Boy Trouble
  10. Wish You Were Here

Shy Boy

Lyrics

He used to be a shy boy
Until I made him my boy
I never missed a heartbeat
Just sitting in the back seat

I’m gonna give him all my love
Each and every night
One thing I know he’s dreaming of
I wanna squeeze and hold him tight

But don’t it make you feel good
(Shoop shoop aaahh)
And don’t it make you feel good
(Shoop shoop aaahh)
Don’t it make you feel good
(Shoop shoop aaahh)
And don’t it make you feel good
(Shoop shoop aaahh)

Everything we put together
Seems to last forever
He knows about a good time
Gonna make him all mine

He gives me lovin like nobody else
I like the way he turns me on
I wanna keep him all to myself
If my heart could beat that strong

But don’t it make you feel good
(Shoop shoop aaahh)
And don’t it make you feel good
(Shoop shoop aaahh)
Don’t it make you feel good
(Shoop shoop aaahh)
And don’t it make you feel good
(Shoop shoop aaahh)

I’m gonna give him all my love
Each and every night
One thing I know he’s dreaming of
I wanna squeeze and hold him tight

But don’t it make you
(Shoop shoop aaahh)
But don’t it make you
(Shoop shoop aaahh)

He gives me lovin like nobody else
I like the way he turns me on
I wanna keep him all to myself
If my heart could beat that strong

But don’t it make you feel good
(Shoop shoop aaahh)
And don’t it make you feel good
(Shoop shoop aaahh)
Don’t it make you feel good
(Shoop shoop aaahh)
And don’t it make you feel good
(Shoop shoop aaahh)

But don’t it make you feel good
(Shoop shoop aaahh)
And don’t it make you feel good
(Shoop shoop aaahh)
Don’t it make you feel good
(Shoop shoop aaahh)
And don’t it make you feel good
(Shoop shoop aaahh)

Reference

Deep Sea Skiving – Wikipedia