Lance Henriksen

Lance Henriksen is an actor known for his distinctive, rugged appearance and commanding screen presence. He began his acting career in the 1960s, but it was in the 1980s that he really started to make a name for himself in Hollywood. During this decade, Henriksen appeared in a number of films that would go on to become cult classics, cementing his status as one of the most versatile and talented actors of his generation.

Career

Lance Henriksen is an actor known for his distinctive, rugged appearance and commanding screen presence. He began his acting career in the 1960s, but it was in the 1980s that he really started to make a name for himself in Hollywood. During this decade, Henriksen appeared in a number of films that would go on to become cult classics, cementing his status as one of the most versatile and talented actors of his generation.

Terminator

Henriksen appeared in the blockbuster sci-fi film “Terminator” as Detective Vukovich.

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Henrikson in Terminator

Aliens

One of the most iconic roles of Lance Henriksen’s career came in the form of the android Bishop in James Cameron’s 1986 film “Aliens”. Bishop was a fan-favorite character, and Henriksen’s performance earned him critical acclaim. The film was a box office smash and is now widely regarded as one of the greatest sci-fi films of all time.

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Henrikson As Bishop In Aliens

Henriksen also appeared in the 1987 action-thriller “Near Dark”, directed by Kathryn Bigelow. The film tells the story of a young man who becomes involved with a group of vampire outlaws. Henriksen played the role of Jesse, the charismatic and ruthless leader of the group. His performance was one of the highlights of the film and helped to establish him as a major talent in the world of genre filmmaking.

In addition to his work in sci-fi and horror films, Henriksen also appeared in a number of crime dramas and thrillers throughout the 1980s. One notable example is “The Hitcher” (1986), in which Henriksen played the role of a sadistic serial killer who torments a young man played by C. Thomas Howell. The film was controversial upon its release due to its graphic violence and dark subject matter, but Henriksen’s performance was universally praised.

Pumpkinhead

Another film in which Henriksen appeared in the 80s was “Pumpkinhead” (1988), a horror film directed by special effects artist Stan Winston. The film tells the story of a man who seeks vengeance against a group of teenagers who accidentally killed his son. Henriksen played the role of Ed Harley, the grieving father who summons the titular monster to do his bidding. While the film was not a major box office success, it has since become a cult classic, and Henriksen’s performance is often cited as one of the film’s highlights.

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Henrikson In Pumpkinhead

Henriksen’s versatility as an actor was on full display in the 1989 film “Johnny Handsome”, in which he played a detective who takes an interest in the titular character, played by Mickey Rourke. Rourke’s character is a disfigured criminal who undergoes plastic surgery to change his appearance but finds that his past sins continue to haunt him. Henriksen’s performance in the film was understated and nuanced and helped to elevate the film beyond its pulpy premise.

Despite his success in the 80s, Henriksen has continued to work steadily in the decades since. He has appeared in a number of high-profile films and TV shows, including “The Terminator”, “Millennium”, and “Scream 3”. In addition to his work as an actor, Henriksen is also an accomplished artist and writer.

Conclusion

In conclusion, Lance Henriksen’s work in the 1980s helped to establish him as one of the most versatile and talented actors of his generation. Whether he was playing a heroic android, a sadistic killer, or a grieving father seeking vengeance, Henriksen always brought a sense of gravitas and depth to his roles. His contributions to the world of genre filmmaking cannot be overstated, and his work continues to inspire and entertain audiences to this day.

Reference

Lance Henriksen – Wikipedia